Discussion:
What's your opinion of Tama?
(too old to reply)
a***@hotmail.com
2008-04-09 02:41:05 UTC
Permalink
I am curious about how others view Tama's drums. To me, they're right
up there with Sonor as one of the most consistently high quality and
impressive drum companies. I also love Tama's punchy sound. Their
drums are well crafted and their hardware is top of the line. Of the
Big Three Japanese Drum Companies, I'd probably give them the edge
overall.

I grew up in the 80s, when Tama was king! They've always had a
certain mystique for me. Then again, there are things I love about
Yamaha, Ludwig, Taye, and Mapex. But I'd be curious to know how
others see Tama in relation to other drum companies.

Postlethwaite Windschitl
Pete Pemberton
2008-04-09 03:50:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by a***@hotmail.com
I am curious about how others view Tama's drums. To me, they're right
up there with Sonor as one of the most consistently high quality and
impressive drum companies. I also love Tama's punchy sound. Their
drums are well crafted and their hardware is top of the line. Of the
Big Three Japanese Drum Companies, I'd probably give them the edge
overall.
I grew up in the 80s, when Tama was king! They've always had a
certain mystique for me. Then again, there are things I love about
Yamaha, Ludwig, Taye, and Mapex. But I'd be curious to know how
others see Tama in relation to other drum companies.
Postlethwaite Windschitl
I'll say it again, I like the Exotix! Pretty drums. ddrum Dios is
pretty nice too. Bubinga for half.
--
______
PP
Chris Milillo
2008-04-09 05:21:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by a***@hotmail.com
I am curious about how others view Tama's drums. To me, they're right
up there with Sonor as one of the most consistently high quality and
impressive drum companies. I also love Tama's punchy sound. Their
drums are well crafted and their hardware is top of the line. Of the
Big Three Japanese Drum Companies, I'd probably give them the edge
overall.
I grew up in the 80s, when Tama was king! They've always had a
certain mystique for me. Then again, there are things I love about
Yamaha, Ludwig, Taye, and Mapex. But I'd be curious to know how
others see Tama in relation to other drum companies.
Postlethwaite Windschitl
I'm a HUGE Tama fan and currently own 3 Tama kits. I began playing Tama in
my impressionable teen years because Neil Peart played them. However, I kept
playing them long after Neil moved on to other companies because they sound
and look great, and I've always felt their hardware is the most innovative,
practical, and well designed on the market. I always get compliments on my
drum sound, whether live or in the studio. And to be honest, I don't change
my heads very often. I've never changed the heads on my Maple kit (acquired
in Dec. 2003) and it still sounds great. It's not because I don't have the
heads, as I actually have practically a drum shop's worth of new heads ready
for installation. If it ain't broke, I don't fix it.

I got my first Tama kit (my 3rd kit overall) in 1986, and it was a used
Imperialstar in Metallic White. My next kit was a brand new Candy Apple Red
Superstar in 1987 (I still use it on every rock gig). I added a brand new
Starclassic Performer to the arsenal in 2000. I later "upgraded" to a used
Starclassic Maple in late 2003 and sold the Performers to legendary RMMP'er
jmt. Oh, I almost forgot. About two years ago, I picked up an old 1974 Tama
Royalstar in silver (almost identical in color to my first set of
Imperialstars) for my secondary teaching studio.

Yeah, Tama rocks.

CM
Jeff Burns
2008-04-09 12:26:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chris Milillo
I am curious about how others view Tama's drums.  To me, they're right
up there with Sonor as one of the most consistently high quality and
impressive drum companies.  I also love Tama's punchy sound.  Their
drums are well crafted and their hardware is top of the line.  Of the
Big Three Japanese Drum Companies, I'd probably give them the edge
overall.
I grew up in the 80s, when Tama was king!  They've always had a
certain mystique for me.  Then again, there are things I love about
Yamaha, Ludwig, Taye, and Mapex.  But I'd be curious to know how
others see Tama in relation to other drum companies.
Postlethwaite Windschitl
I'm a HUGE Tama fan and currently own 3 Tama kits. I began playing Tama in
my impressionable teen years because Neil Peart played them. However, I kept
playing them long after Neil moved on to other companies because they sound
and look great, and I've always felt their hardware is the most innovative,
practical, and well designed on the market. I always get compliments on my
drum sound, whether live or in the studio. And to be honest, I don't change
my heads very often. I've never changed the heads on my Maple kit (acquired
in Dec. 2003) and it still sounds great. It's not because I don't have the
heads, as I actually have practically a drum shop's worth of new heads ready
for installation. If it ain't broke, I don't fix it.
I got my first Tama kit (my 3rd kit overall) in 1986, and it was a used
Imperialstar in Metallic White. My next kit was a brand new Candy Apple Red
Superstar in 1987 (I still use it on every rock gig). I added a brand new
Starclassic Performer to the arsenal in 2000. I later "upgraded" to a used
Starclassic Maple in late 2003 and sold the Performers to legendary RMMP'er
jmt. Oh, I almost forgot. About two years ago, I picked up an old 1974 Tama
Royalstar in silver (almost identical in color to my first set of
Imperialstars) for my secondary teaching studio.
Yeah, Tama rocks.
CM
I've got a kit of Vintage Nickle Sparkple Hyper-Drives on order which
will hopefully arrive shortly.. looking forward to giving Tama a try.
j***@gmail.com
2008-04-26 03:51:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chris Milillo
Post by a***@hotmail.com
I am curious about how others view Tama's drums. To me, they're right
up there with Sonor as one of the most consistently high quality and
impressive drum companies. I also love Tama's punchy sound. Their
drums are well crafted and their hardware is top of the line. Of the
Big Three Japanese Drum Companies, I'd probably give them the edge
overall.
I grew up in the 80s, when Tama was king! They've always had a
certain mystique for me. Then again, there are things I love about
Yamaha, Ludwig, Taye, and Mapex. But I'd be curious to know how
others see Tama in relation to other drum companies.
Postlethwaite Windschitl
I'm a HUGE Tama fan and currently own 3 Tama kits. I began playing Tama in
my impressionable teen years because Neil Peart played them. However, I kept
playing them long after Neil moved on to other companies because they sound
and look great, and I've always felt their hardware is the most innovative,
practical, and well designed on the market. I always get compliments on my
drum sound, whether live or in the studio. And to be honest, I don't change
my heads very often. I've never changed the heads on my Maple kit (acquired
in Dec. 2003) and it still sounds great. It's not because I don't have the
heads, as I actually have practically a drum shop's worth of new heads ready
for installation. If it ain't broke, I don't fix it.
I got my first Tama kit (my 3rd kit overall) in 1986, and it was a used
Imperialstar in Metallic White. My next kit was a brand new Candy Apple Red
Superstar in 1987 (I still use it on every rock gig). I added a brand new
Starclassic Performer to the arsenal in 2000. I later "upgraded" to a used
Starclassic Maple in late 2003 and sold the Performers to legendary RMMP'erjmt. Oh, I almost forgot. About two years ago, I picked up an old 1974 Tama
Royalstar in silver (almost identical in color to my first set of
Imperialstars) for my secondary teaching studio.
Yeah, Tama rocks.
CM
Dear Crispy;
Still got em and glove em a lot I do...
WholeLottaQuakinGoinOn;
jmt
Chris Milillo
2008-04-26 08:15:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by j***@gmail.com
Post by Chris Milillo
Post by a***@hotmail.com
I am curious about how others view Tama's drums. To me, they're right
up there with Sonor as one of the most consistently high quality and
impressive drum companies. I also love Tama's punchy sound. Their
drums are well crafted and their hardware is top of the line. Of the
Big Three Japanese Drum Companies, I'd probably give them the edge
overall.
I grew up in the 80s, when Tama was king! They've always had a
certain mystique for me. Then again, there are things I love about
Yamaha, Ludwig, Taye, and Mapex. But I'd be curious to know how
others see Tama in relation to other drum companies.
Postlethwaite Windschitl
I'm a HUGE Tama fan and currently own 3 Tama kits. I began playing Tama in
my impressionable teen years because Neil Peart played them. However, I kept
playing them long after Neil moved on to other companies because they sound
and look great, and I've always felt their hardware is the most innovative,
practical, and well designed on the market. I always get compliments on my
drum sound, whether live or in the studio. And to be honest, I don't change
my heads very often. I've never changed the heads on my Maple kit (acquired
in Dec. 2003) and it still sounds great. It's not because I don't have the
heads, as I actually have practically a drum shop's worth of new heads ready
for installation. If it ain't broke, I don't fix it.
I got my first Tama kit (my 3rd kit overall) in 1986, and it was a used
Imperialstar in Metallic White. My next kit was a brand new Candy Apple Red
Superstar in 1987 (I still use it on every rock gig). I added a brand new
Starclassic Performer to the arsenal in 2000. I later "upgraded" to a used
Starclassic Maple in late 2003 and sold the Performers to legendary
RMMP'erjmt. Oh, I almost forgot. About two years ago, I picked up an old
1974 Tama
Royalstar in silver (almost identical in color to my first set of
Imperialstars) for my secondary teaching studio.
Yeah, Tama rocks.
CM
Dear Crispy;
Still got em and glove em a lot I do...
WholeLottaQuakinGoinOn;
jmt
Well I'll be damned... Look who it is! Glad you're still digging the
Performers.

CM
j***@gmail.com
2008-04-26 09:33:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by j***@gmail.com
Post by Chris Milillo
Post by a***@hotmail.com
I am curious about how others view Tama's drums. To me, they're right
up there with Sonor as one of the most consistently high quality and
impressive drum companies. I also love Tama's punchy sound. Their
drums are well crafted and their hardware is top of the line. Of the
Big Three Japanese Drum Companies, I'd probably give them the edge
overall.
I grew up in the 80s, when Tama was king! They've always had a
certain mystique for me. Then again, there are things I love about
Yamaha, Ludwig, Taye, and Mapex. But I'd be curious to know how
others see Tama in relation to other drum companies.
Postlethwaite Windschitl
I'm a HUGE Tama fan and currently own 3 Tama kits. I began playing Tama in
my impressionable teen years because Neil Peart played them. However, I kept
playing them long after Neil moved on to other companies because they sound
and look great, and I've always felt their hardware is the most innovative,
practical, and well designed on the market. I always get compliments on my
drum sound, whether live or in the studio. And to be honest, I don't change
my heads very often. I've never changed the heads on my Maple kit (acquired
in Dec. 2003) and it still sounds great. It's not because I don't have the
heads, as I actually have practically a drum shop's worth of new heads ready
for installation. If it ain't broke, I don't fix it.
I got my first Tama kit (my 3rd kit overall) in 1986, and it was a used
Imperialstar in Metallic White. My next kit was a brand new Candy Apple Red
Superstar in 1987 (I still use it on every rock gig). I added a brand new
Starclassic Performer to the arsenal in 2000. I later "upgraded" to a used
Starclassic Maple in late 2003 and sold the Performers to legendary
RMMP'erjmt. Oh, I almost forgot. About two years ago, I picked up an old
1974 Tama
Royalstar in silver (almost identical in color to my first set of
Imperialstars) for my secondary teaching studio.
Yeah, Tama rocks.
CM
Dear Crispy;
Still got em and glove em a lot I do...
WholeLottaQuakinGoinOn;
jmt
Well I'll beD damned... Look who it is! Glad you're still digging the
Performers.
CM
Dear Crispos;
"As ever goddam was, just a poor AmerIrish peasant, straight out
of the Quake-Ridden bog, that's me Your Worship"......
So what's new with youse?;
jmt
Aaron Draper
2008-04-26 12:43:11 UTC
Permalink
Didn't fall into the fault line, didjya John? :-)

Good to see you, old timer.
--
....Aaron
"He does seem to have a good amount of 'self of steam' for a retard though."
--Robert Schuh
www.myspace.com/thateightiesguy
www.myspace.com/baileyscomet
Post by j***@gmail.com
Post by j***@gmail.com
Post by Chris Milillo
Post by a***@hotmail.com
I am curious about how others view Tama's drums. To me, they're right
up there with Sonor as one of the most consistently high quality and
impressive drum companies. I also love Tama's punchy sound. Their
drums are well crafted and their hardware is top of the line. Of the
Big Three Japanese Drum Companies, I'd probably give them the edge
overall.
I grew up in the 80s, when Tama was king! They've always had a
certain mystique for me. Then again, there are things I love about
Yamaha, Ludwig, Taye, and Mapex. But I'd be curious to know how
others see Tama in relation to other drum companies.
Postlethwaite Windschitl
I'm a HUGE Tama fan and currently own 3 Tama kits. I began playing
Tama
in
my impressionable teen years because Neil Peart played them. However,
I
kept
playing them long after Neil moved on to other companies because they sound
and look great, and I've always felt their hardware is the most innovative,
practical, and well designed on the market. I always get compliments
on
my
drum sound, whether live or in the studio. And to be honest, I don't change
my heads very often. I've never changed the heads on my Maple kit (acquired
in Dec. 2003) and it still sounds great. It's not because I don't have the
heads, as I actually have practically a drum shop's worth of new heads ready
for installation. If it ain't broke, I don't fix it.
I got my first Tama kit (my 3rd kit overall) in 1986, and it was a used
Imperialstar in Metallic White. My next kit was a brand new Candy
Apple
Red
Superstar in 1987 (I still use it on every rock gig). I added a brand new
Starclassic Performer to the arsenal in 2000. I later "upgraded" to a used
Starclassic Maple in late 2003 and sold the Performers to legendary
RMMP'erjmt. Oh, I almost forgot. About two years ago, I picked up an old
1974 Tama
Royalstar in silver (almost identical in color to my first set of
Imperialstars) for my secondary teaching studio.
Yeah, Tama rocks.
CM
Dear Crispy;
Still got em and glove em a lot I do...
WholeLottaQuakinGoinOn;
jmt
Well I'll beD damned... Look who it is! Glad you're still digging the
Performers.
CM
Dear Crispos;
"As ever goddam was, just a poor AmerIrish peasant, straight out
of the Quake-Ridden bog, that's me Your Worship"......
So what's new with youse?;
jmt
j***@gmail.com
2008-04-26 14:45:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by Aaron Draper
Didn't fall into the fault line, didjya John? :-)
Good to see you, old timer.
--
....Aaron
"He does seem to have a good amount of 'self of steam' for a retard though."
Post by j***@gmail.com
Post by j***@gmail.com
Post by Chris Milillo
Post by a***@hotmail.com
I am curious about how others view Tama's drums. To me, they're right
up there with Sonor as one of the most consistently high quality and
impressive drum companies. I also love Tama's punchy sound. Their
drums are well crafted and their hardware is top of the line. Of the
Big Three Japanese Drum Companies, I'd probably give them the edge
overall.
I grew up in the 80s, when Tama was king! They've always had a
certain mystique for me. Then again, there are things I love about
Yamaha, Ludwig, Taye, and Mapex. But I'd be curious to know how
others see Tama in relation to other drum companies.
Postlethwaite Windschitl
I'm a HUGE Tama fan and currently own 3 Tama kits. I began playing
Tama
in
my impressionable teen years because Neil Peart played them. However,
I
kept
playing them long after Neil moved on to other companies because they sound
and look great, and I've always felt their hardware is the most innovative,
practical, and well designed on the market. I always get compliments
on
my
drum sound, whether live or in the studio. And to be honest, I don't change
my heads very often. I've never changed the heads on my Maple kit (acquired
in Dec. 2003) and it still sounds great. It's not because I don't have the
heads, as I actually have practically a drum shop's worth of new heads ready
for installation. If it ain't broke, I don't fix it.
I got my first Tama kit (my 3rd kit overall) in 1986, and it was a used
Imperialstar in Metallic White. My next kit was a brand new Candy
Apple
Red
Superstar in 1987 (I still use it on every rock gig). I added a brand new
Starclassic Performer to the arsenal in 2000. I later "upgraded" to a used
Starclassic Maple in late 2003 and sold the Performers to legendary
RMMP'erjmt. Oh, I almost forgot. About two years ago, I picked up an old
1974 Tama
Royalstar in silver (almost identical in color to my first set of
Imperialstars) for my secondary teaching studio.
Yeah, Tama rocks.
CM
Dear Crispy;
Still got em and glove em a lot I do...
WholeLottaQuakinGoinOn;
jmt
Well I'll beD damned... Look who it is! Glad you're still digging the
Performers.
CM
Dear Crispos;
"As ever goddam was, just a poor AmerIrish peasant, straight out
of the Quake-Ridden bog, that's me Your Worship"......
So what's new with youse?;
jmt
Dear Aaronimo;
ThankYouVeryMuchIndeed...
The Fault, dear Bootus, is not in our Starbucks,
but in our SelfOfSteams...
Goddam I've
missed this place;(sniff)

jmt
Scott Logsdon
2008-04-29 18:36:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by j***@gmail.com
Post by Aaron Draper
Didn't fall into the fault line, didjya John? :-)
Good to see you, old timer.
--
....Aaron
"He does seem to have a good amount of 'self of steam' for a retard though."
--Robert
Post by j***@gmail.com
Post by j***@gmail.com
Post by Chris Milillo
Post by a***@hotmail.com
I am curious about how others view Tama's drums. To me, they're right
up there with Sonor as one of the most consistently high quality and
impressive drum companies. I also love Tama's punchy sound. Their
drums are well crafted and their hardware is top of the line. Of the
Big Three Japanese Drum Companies, I'd probably give them the edge
overall.
I grew up in the 80s, when Tama was king! They've always had a
certain mystique for me. Then again, there are things I love about
Yamaha, Ludwig, Taye, and Mapex. But I'd be curious to know how
others see Tama in relation to other drum companies.
Postlethwaite Windschitl
I'm a HUGE Tama fan and currently own 3 Tama kits. I began playing
Tama
in
my impressionable teen years because Neil Peart played them. However,
I
kept
playing them long after Neil moved on to other companies because they sound
and look great, and I've always felt their hardware is the most innovative,
practical, and well designed on the market. I always get compliments
on
my
drum sound, whether live or in the studio. And to be honest, I don't change
my heads very often. I've never changed the heads on my Maple kit (acquired
in Dec. 2003) and it still sounds great. It's not because I don't have the
heads, as I actually have practically a drum shop's worth of new heads ready
for installation. If it ain't broke, I don't fix it.
I got my first Tama kit (my 3rd kit overall) in 1986, and it was a used
Imperialstar in Metallic White. My next kit was a brand new Candy
Apple
Red
Superstar in 1987 (I still use it on every rock gig). I added a brand new
Starclassic Performer to the arsenal in 2000. I later "upgraded" to a used
Starclassic Maple in late 2003 and sold the Performers to legendary
RMMP'erjmt. Oh, I almost forgot. About two years ago, I picked up an old
1974 Tama
Royalstar in silver (almost identical in color to my first set of
Imperialstars) for my secondary teaching studio.
Yeah, Tama rocks.
CM
Dear Crispy;
Still got em and glove em a lot I do...
WholeLottaQuakinGoinOn;
jmt
Well I'll beD damned... Look who it is! Glad you're still digging the
Performers.
CM
Dear Crispos;
"As ever goddam was, just a poor AmerIrish peasant, straight out
of the Quake-Ridden bog, that's me Your Worship"......
So what's new with youse?;
jmt
Dear Aaronimo;
ThankYouVeryMuchIndeed...
The Fault, dear Bootus, is not in our Starbucks,
but in our SelfOfSteams...
Goddam I've
missed this place;(sniff)
jmt
Mein Gott!!! It's a poultrygeist!!! How dare you show up right after
the group has been pronounced dead and on its way to the crematorium...

Nice to see ya Jempty!
--
Also known as Rev. Poindexter
pastor and curator of www.sonormuseum.com
j***@gmail.com
2008-05-01 05:59:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Scott Logsdon
Post by j***@gmail.com
Post by Aaron Draper
Didn't fall into the fault line, didjya John? :-)
Good to see you, old timer.
--
....Aaron
"He does seem to have a good amount of 'self of steam' for a retard though."
--Robert
Post by j***@gmail.com
Post by j***@gmail.com
Post by Chris Milillo
Post by a***@hotmail.com
I am curious about how others view Tama's drums. To me, they're right
up there with Sonor as one of the most consistently high quality and
impressive drum companies. I also love Tama's punchy sound. Their
drums are well crafted and their hardware is top of the line. Of the
Big Three Japanese Drum Companies, I'd probably give them the edge
overall.
I grew up in the 80s, when Tama was king! They've always had a
certain mystique for me. Then again, there are things I love about
Yamaha, Ludwig, Taye, and Mapex. But I'd be curious to know how
others see Tama in relation to other drum companies.
Postlethwaite Windschitl
I'm a HUGE Tama fan and currently own 3 Tama kits. I began playing
Tama
in
my impressionable teen years because Neil Peart played them. However,
I
kept
playing them long after Neil moved on to other companies because they sound
and look great, and I've always felt their hardware is the most innovative,
practical, and well designed on the market. I always get compliments
on
my
drum sound, whether live or in the studio. And to be honest, I don't change
my heads very often. I've never changed the heads on my Maple kit (acquired
in Dec. 2003) and it still sounds great. It's not because I don't have the
heads, as I actually have practically a drum shop's worth of new heads ready
for installation. If it ain't broke, I don't fix it.
I got my first Tama kit (my 3rd kit overall) in 1986, and it was a used
Imperialstar in Metallic White. My next kit was a brand new Candy
Apple
Red
Superstar in 1987 (I still use it on every rock gig). I added a brand new
Starclassic Performer to the arsenal in 2000. I later "upgraded" to a used
Starclassic Maple in late 2003 and sold the Performers to legendary
RMMP'erjmt. Oh, I almost forgot. About two years ago, I picked up an old
1974 Tama
Royalstar in silver (almost identical in color to my first set of
Imperialstars) for my secondary teaching studio.
Yeah, Tama rocks.
CM
Dear Crispy;
Still got em and glove em a lot I do...
WholeLottaQuakinGoinOn;
jmt
Well I'll beD damned... Look who it is! Glad you're still digging the
Performers.
CM
Dear Crispos;
"As ever goddam was, just a poor AmerIrish peasant, straight out
of the Quake-Ridden bog, that's me Your Worship"......
So what's new with youse?;
jmt
Dear Aaronimo;
ThankYouVeryMuchIndeed...
The Fault, dear Bootus, is not in our Starbucks,
but in our SelfOfSteams...
Goddam I've
missed this place;(sniff)
jmt
Mein Gott!!! It's a poultrygeist!!! How dare you show up right after
the group has been pronounced dead and on its way to the crematorium...
Nice to see ya Jempty!
--
Also known as Rev. Poindexter
pastor and curator ofwww.sonormuseum.com
Dear RP;
ThankYouVeryMuch....We just had another little ol earthquake,
(bout 20 minutes ago,((but Who's countin'???))...Good thing I have
nerves of Steel and am fearless)....

I want my Xanax and Teddy Bear;

((Help me))

jmt


PS Every goddam day for 2 wks (Thinkin of moving someplace safe,
i.e., Death Valley/GloveCanal/Beirut).......
Scott Logsdon
2008-05-01 16:10:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by j***@gmail.com
Dear RP;
ThankYouVeryMuch....We just had another little ol earthquake,
(bout 20 minutes ago,((but Who's countin'???))...Good thing I have
nerves of Steel and am fearless)....
I want my Xanax and Teddy Bear;
((Help me))
jmt
PS Every goddam day for 2 wks (Thinkin of moving someplace safe,
i.e., Death Valley/GloveCanal/Beirut).......
I know what you mean. We were about 70 miles from the epicenter for the
1992 Landers quake (a 7.2) and later that same day a 6 point something
in Big Bear about 20 miles away. They can be unnerving to say the least.

Glad you're OK.

P.S. in the absinthe of Xanax, try a good single malt like Glenmorangie
in the Sherry Barrell Finish. Yummy!
--
Also known as Rev. Poindexter
pastor and curator of www.sonormuseum.com
j***@gmail.com
2008-05-02 06:50:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by Scott Logsdon
Post by j***@gmail.com
Dear RP;
ThankYouVeryMuch....We just had another little ol earthquake,
(bout 20 minutes ago,((but Who's countin'???))...Good thing I have
nerves of Steel and am fearless)....
I want my Xanax and Teddy Bear;
((Help me))
jmt
PS Every goddam day for 2 wks (Thinkin of moving someplace safe,
i.e., Death Valley/GloveCanal/Beirut).......
I know what you mean. We were about 70 miles from the epicenter for the
1992 Landers quake (a 7.2) and later that same day a 6 point something
in Big Bear about 20 miles away. They can be unnerving to say the least.
Glad you're OK.
P.S. in the absinthe of Xanax, try a good single malt like Glenmorangie
in the Sherry Barrell Finish. Yummy!
--
Also known as Rev. Poindexter
pastor and curator ofwww.sonormuseum.com
Dear InCogitoErgoSumatra;
I ape-reciate the Spirited Thought, but my Drinking
Privileges were revoked many Years ago after attempting to do a solo
reenactment of the clash 'tween the Monitor and the Merrimac in a
Public fountain at high noon in an undisclosed Hoosier Metropolis......
(bastards had NO sense of humor whatever)
R a m m i n g S p e e
d;

jmt
JaKe
2008-04-09 14:57:17 UTC
Permalink
I am curious about how others view Tama's drums.  To me, they're right
up there with Sonor as one of the most consistently high quality and
impressive drum companies.  I also love Tama's punchy sound.  Their
drums are well crafted and their hardware is top of the line.  Of the
Big Three Japanese Drum Companies, I'd probably give them the edge
overall.
I grew up in the 80s, when Tama was king!  They've always had a
certain mystique for me.  Then again, there are things I love about
Yamaha, Ludwig, Taye, and Mapex.  But I'd be curious to know how
others see Tama in relation to other drum companies.
Postlethwaite Windschitl
Some of the best drum hardware out there. The Starcast isolated tom
mounts are the best and most robust design out there now. Tama is
also affordable too.

IMHO of course,
JaKe
Paul Francisco
2008-04-09 16:36:15 UTC
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Post by a***@hotmail.com
I am curious about how others view Tama's drums. To me, they're right
up there with Sonor as one of the most consistently high quality and
impressive drum companies. I also love Tama's punchy sound. Their
drums are well crafted and their hardware is top of the line. Of the
Big Three Japanese Drum Companies, I'd probably give them the edge
overall.
I grew up in the 80s, when Tama was king! They've always had a
certain mystique for me. Then again, there are things I love about
Yamaha, Ludwig, Taye, and Mapex. But I'd be curious to know how
others see Tama in relation to other drum companies.
Postlethwaite Windschitl
Tama is definitely up there, but what makes them even better is that
they can make high quality drums that sound great and are professional
in every way, and still make them at a budget that most drummers can
*afford*. I love Yamaha drums too, but compare a StarClassic
Performer kit to a Birch Custom Absolute kit pricewise and I'll take
the Tama's thenk-yew-very-much... (don't even go looking at the Sonor
high-end stuff pricewise... ack!)

Quality-wise tho, and not taking into account for price - Tama, Yamaha
and Sonor are alll excellent fit-and-finish and are my three favorite
drums all around (I have a kit of each, go figure - Beech Customs,
Maple SC's, and an older Sonor Force 3000 kit). No mystique about
them - they're extremely well-designed and well-built drums!

Paul
Mike Raverty
2008-04-10 23:33:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by a***@hotmail.com
I am curious about how others view Tama's drums. To me, they're right
up there with Sonor as one of the most consistently high quality and
impressive drum companies. I also love Tama's punchy sound. Their
drums are well crafted and their hardware is top of the line. Of the
Big Three Japanese Drum Companies, I'd probably give them the edge
overall.
I grew up in the 80s, when Tama was king! They've always had a
certain mystique for me. Then again, there are things I love about
Yamaha, Ludwig, Taye, and Mapex. But I'd be curious to know how
others see Tama in relation to other drum companies.
Postlethwaite Windschitl
All I know is that I played one of those glass-glitter finish bubunga
kits at the local drum shop, and ever since I've been trying to figure
out what I can sell so that I can afford it ;). I was amazed at the
quality of the kit, and they sounded and looked AMAZING!
Aaron Draper
2008-04-15 14:20:01 UTC
Permalink
I've got three Tama SC Performer kits currently. I've sold off one, and
used to own a '86 set of Imperialstars. I love my Performers, as many have
said, they are affordable and sound great. My only complaint is that now
all my drummer buddies that play locally have followed suit and now play
SCs. Which makes me want to get back to some American-made drums because,
well, I like to be different. :-)
--
....Aaron
"He does seem to have a good amount of 'self of steam' for a retard though."
--Robert Schuh
www.myspace.com/thateightiesguy
www.myspace.com/baileyscomet
Post by a***@hotmail.com
I am curious about how others view Tama's drums. To me, they're right
up there with Sonor as one of the most consistently high quality and
impressive drum companies. I also love Tama's punchy sound. Their
drums are well crafted and their hardware is top of the line. Of the
Big Three Japanese Drum Companies, I'd probably give them the edge
overall.
I grew up in the 80s, when Tama was king! They've always had a
certain mystique for me. Then again, there are things I love about
Yamaha, Ludwig, Taye, and Mapex. But I'd be curious to know how
others see Tama in relation to other drum companies.
Postlethwaite Windschitl
Mackenzie
2008-05-03 02:57:20 UTC
Permalink
I am curious about how others view Tama's drums.  To me, they're right
up there with Sonor as one of the most consistently high quality and
impressive drum companies.  I also love Tama's punchy sound.  Their
drums are well crafted and their hardware is top of the line.  Of the
Big Three Japanese Drum Companies, I'd probably give them the edge
overall.
I grew up in the 80s, when Tama was king!  They've always had a
certain mystique for me.  Then again, there are things I love about
Yamaha, Ludwig, Taye, and Mapex.  But I'd be curious to know how
others see Tama in relation to other drum companies.
Postlethwaite Windschitl
I'll always go with the Ludwig.

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