Discussion:
knee problem - advice?
(too old to reply)
dshitzu
2007-01-21 14:45:00 UTC
Permalink
I've recently started playing again. I'm 53 yrs. old. My left knee
(high hat) has begun to hurt a lot when I play. My right knee (bass
drum) is OK - aches a little but not a lot. The left knee is so bad I
can't stand up after playing. I've tried just resting my foot on the
high-hat stand rather than pushing it down, which has been my habit but
this doesn't seem to make any difference. I've made sure that the angle
of my leg is not twisted but is in a 'natural' position. Should I
strengthen the knee at the gym or would that just make it worse? This
is really a big pain since I just spent $3K on new equipment (Gretsch
Renown - sound absolutely great!) Any advice would be greatly
appreciated!
Pat McDonald
2007-01-21 15:06:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by dshitzu
I've recently started playing again. I'm 53 yrs. old. My left knee
(high hat) has begun to hurt a lot when I play. My right knee (bass
drum) is OK - aches a little but not a lot. The left knee is so bad I
can't stand up after playing. I've tried just resting my foot on the
high-hat stand rather than pushing it down, which has been my habit but
this doesn't seem to make any difference. I've made sure that the angle
of my leg is not twisted but is in a 'natural' position. Should I
strengthen the knee at the gym or would that just make it worse? This
is really a big pain since I just spent $3K on new equipment (Gretsch
Renown - sound absolutely great!) Any advice would be greatly
appreciated!
Check to see how high you're sitting. If you sit TOO low, you could be
straining your knees too much. Most folks recommend sitting no lower than
thighs parallel to the floor. If you're sitting really low, try raising
your seat up gradually over the next few days until your knees aren't bent so
far. Bring the parts of the kit up at the same time so you aren't sitting
up way high and having to bend down to play.

I'm 41. As I've gotten older, my knees have started giving me fits.
Especially if I do alot of physical labor---mowing my lawn, carrying heavy
lumber for remodels, etc. I asked my doctor a couple of years ago about
it and he recommended taking Glucosamine. I tried it and it worked like
magic. I take a couple of capsules every morning. I've been taking it
now for 3-4 years. My knees feel like they did when I was 20. It
doesn't work overnight. You have to take it for a couple of months and
suddenly, you'll notice one day that they don't hurt NEARLY as much as they
did. If you don't take it already, I highly recommend it.



Pat
Steve Turner
2007-01-22 19:19:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Pat McDonald
Post by dshitzu
I've recently started playing again. I'm 53 yrs. old. My left knee
(high hat) has begun to hurt a lot when I play. My right knee (bass
drum) is OK - aches a little but not a lot. The left knee is so bad I
can't stand up after playing. I've tried just resting my foot on the
high-hat stand rather than pushing it down, which has been my habit but
this doesn't seem to make any difference. I've made sure that the angle
of my leg is not twisted but is in a 'natural' position. Should I
strengthen the knee at the gym or would that just make it worse? This
is really a big pain since I just spent $3K on new equipment (Gretsch
Renown - sound absolutely great!) Any advice would be greatly
appreciated!
Check to see how high you're sitting. If you sit TOO low, you could be
straining your knees too much. Most folks recommend sitting no lower than
thighs parallel to the floor. If you're sitting really low, try raising
your seat up gradually over the next few days until your knees aren't bent so
far. Bring the parts of the kit up at the same time so you aren't sitting
up way high and having to bend down to play.
Exactly my experience. I've been playing since I was nine or ten
(beginning around 1971/72) and for most of the last 25 years or so I had
settled into a throne height that put the backs of my thighs parallel to
the ground. I quit gigging out some time in the late eighties, until
about four years ago when I got back into it again on a fairly regular
basis. My knees started giving me fits! I never was a fan of sitting
up high, but I did try raising my throne up about two inches (not TOO
high!) and Lo and Behold: all drumming related knee problems vanished.
My knees still bother me in other contexts, but not when I'm drumming.
Post by Pat McDonald
I'm 41. As I've gotten older, my knees have started giving me fits.
Especially if I do alot of physical labor---mowing my lawn, carrying heavy
lumber for remodels, etc. I asked my doctor a couple of years ago about
it and he recommended taking Glucosamine. I tried it and it worked like
magic. I take a couple of capsules every morning. I've been taking it
now for 3-4 years. My knees feel like they did when I was 20. It
doesn't work overnight. You have to take it for a couple of months and
suddenly, you'll notice one day that they don't hurt NEARLY as much as they
did. If you don't take it already, I highly recommend it.
Hmm. I'm going to have to try that (I'll run it by my doctor first). A
quick web search indicates that selecting an effective brand may not be
a simple matter; any recommendations? I just turned 45 and I'm starting
to have problems with my fingers as well. Gettin' old sucks! :-)
--
See Nad. See Nad go. Go Nad!
To reply, eat the taco.
Pat McDonald
2007-01-23 16:11:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Steve Turner
Hmm. I'm going to have to try that (I'll run it by my doctor first). A
quick web search indicates that selecting an effective brand may not be
a simple matter; any recommendations? I just turned 45 and I'm starting
to have problems with my fingers as well. Gettin' old sucks! :-)
I've been sticking with the name brand stuff and staying away from store
brand versions myself. The daily dosage they recommend is fairly high
so I buy the triple strength Osteo BiFlex. I don't have to choke down a
giant handful of capsules with that. They condense it down into 2 capsules
per day. I take em first thing in the morning and it's as simple as that.

It has really worked wonderfully for me. I can actually bend down and
pick things up without all the cracking and popping and grinding I used to
have!

I had to have some minor surgery last year and they make you stop taking alot
of medication and supplements prior to going under the knife. I ended up
being off it for about 2 weeks because of scheduling errors. By the time
I was cleared to resume taking them, I could feel how much they were helping.
My knees were back to aching in no time so it's one of those things where
you have to get a routine going and stick with it. Once I got back on
them, I was fine.




Pat
John P.
2007-01-21 20:56:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by dshitzu
I've recently started playing again. I'm 53 yrs. old. My left knee
(high hat) has begun to hurt a lot when I play. My right knee (bass
drum) is OK - aches a little but not a lot. The left knee is so bad I
can't stand up after playing. I've tried just resting my foot on the
high-hat stand rather than pushing it down, which has been my habit but
this doesn't seem to make any difference. I've made sure that the angle
of my leg is not twisted but is in a 'natural' position. Should I
strengthen the knee at the gym or would that just make it worse? This
is really a big pain since I just spent $3K on new equipment (Gretsch
Renown - sound absolutely great!) Any advice would be greatly
appreciated!
Well, obviously there is something wrong with your knee... arthritis or
something else. I would think the best thing to do would be to consult with
your (a) doctor. He may recommend exercises that will help, or whatever
other appropriate solutions/options you have.
Tom Betka
2007-01-21 23:57:00 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 21 Jan 2007 14:56:04 -0600, "John P."
Post by John P.
Post by dshitzu
I've recently started playing again. I'm 53 yrs. old. My left knee
(high hat) has begun to hurt a lot when I play. My right knee (bass
drum) is OK - aches a little but not a lot. The left knee is so bad I
can't stand up after playing. I've tried just resting my foot on the
high-hat stand rather than pushing it down, which has been my habit but
this doesn't seem to make any difference. I've made sure that the angle
of my leg is not twisted but is in a 'natural' position. Should I
strengthen the knee at the gym or would that just make it worse? This
is really a big pain since I just spent $3K on new equipment (Gretsch
Renown - sound absolutely great!) Any advice would be greatly
appreciated!
Well, obviously there is something wrong with your knee... arthritis or
something else. I would think the best thing to do would be to consult with
your (a) doctor. He may recommend exercises that will help, or whatever
other appropriate solutions/options you have.
Yes, sounds reasonable... But welcome to the party--as we get older
the joints start to stiffen and creak. If you don't have stiffness
before you play, but you do afterwards, then my guess is that you
indeed have some arthritis. I have had it for years, with the same
symptoms as you.

Do you stretch before you play? About 3-4 months ago I started a
regular workout schedule where I play drums for about 20 minutes to
warm-up, then go ride a recumbent bike for 20 minutes, and then go
workout on my Bowflex for another 10-15 minutes just to work my upper
body. So the total workout is about an hour, and I do it every other
day. I find that my legs are quite stiff and sore for the first 10-15
minutes, but when I am done with the whole routine I can play kick
patterns much easier and more accurate than I could before riding the
exercise bike. I don't do any significant weight-lifting with my legs
mind you--just resistance work on the bicycle. What you really want to
do if you have bad knees is to strengthen the quads to stabilize the
knee; especially the part on the inside of your thigh.

The point is that while athritis may very well be the cause of your
problems (and it wouldn't hurt to see your physician to make sure--all
you really need is an x-ray, for the most part...), it doesn't have to
mean that you cannot play the drums any longer. On the
contrary--osteoarthritis (wear & tear arthritis) responds very well to
range-of-motion exercises and gentle loading, like riding an exercise
bicycle. And if you supplement that with anti-inflammatory medication
as recommended by your doctor, and some glucosamine chondroitin, it
can be controlled for the most part. Eventually if it gets bad enough,
you get a knee replacement.

By the way--you really cannot "strengthen" your knee as there is only
connective tissue fluid in the knee for the most part. You can
certainly strengthen the muscles that *support* the knee (especially
the hamstrings and the quads as I mentioned), and this will most
definitely help--if arthritis is indeed the problem.

As I said...you might start by visiting your doctor for an exam and
maybe an x-ray.

Good luck!

TB (MD, and fellow Gretsch guy)
John P.
2007-01-22 02:59:36 UTC
Permalink
"Tom Betka" wrote in a message
Post by Tom Betka
Post by John P.
Well, obviously there is something wrong with your knee... arthritis or
something else. I would think the best thing to do would be to consult with
your (a) doctor. He may recommend exercises that will help, or whatever
other appropriate solutions/options you have.
Yes, sounds reasonable... But welcome to the party--as we get older
the joints start to stiffen and creak. If you don't have stiffness
before you play, but you do afterwards, then my guess is that you
indeed have some arthritis. I have had it for years, with the same
symptoms as you.
I remember when I wrecked my bike, the old Harley biker dude that saw it
all, was talking to me. He asked me how I felt. When I told him I felt fine,
he told me I'd remember every single joint that touched the pavement when I
got older. He was right! Dammit.
Post by Tom Betka
Do you stretch before you play? About 3-4 months ago I started a
regular workout schedule where I play drums for about 20 minutes to
warm-up, then go ride a recumbent bike for 20 minutes, and then go
workout on my Bowflex for another 10-15 minutes just to work my upper
body. So the total workout is about an hour, and I do it every other
day.
Holy shit Tom... if I did all that, I'd be too sore to play! :-D
Riddim
2007-01-21 23:45:58 UTC
Permalink
Maybe it's a function of how you set up.

MD, Rhythm and Drummer have all run articles on body friendly kit setups;
you might also want to Google the issue. Compare how you set up now to what
the literature suggests.
Post by dshitzu
I've recently started playing again. I'm 53 yrs. old. My left knee
(high hat) has begun to hurt a lot when I play. My right knee (bass
drum) is OK - aches a little but not a lot. The left knee is so bad I
can't stand up after playing. I've tried just resting my foot on the
high-hat stand rather than pushing it down, which has been my habit but
this doesn't seem to make any difference. I've made sure that the angle
of my leg is not twisted but is in a 'natural' position. Should I
strengthen the knee at the gym or would that just make it worse? This
is really a big pain since I just spent $3K on new equipment (Gretsch
Renown - sound absolutely great!) Any advice would be greatly
appreciated!
j***@gmail.com
2013-12-24 14:58:07 UTC
Permalink
Eat a nutritious diet with enough calcium and vitamin D, which helps your body absorb calcium. Calcium is found in dairy products, such as milk, cheese, and yogurt; dark green, leafy vegetables, such as broccoli; and other foods. For more information, see the topic Healthy Eating.

Exercise and stay active. It is best to do weight-bearing exercise for at least 2� hours a week. One way to do this is to be active 30 minutes a day, at least 5 days a week. In addition to weight-bearing exercise, experts recommend that you do resistance exercises at least 2 days a week. Exercises that are not weight-bearing, such as swimming, are good for your general health. But they do not work your muscles and bones against gravity and so they do not stimulate new bone growth. Starting these exercises at any age will help prevent bone loss. But if you stop exercising, your bones will begin to thin. Talk to your doctor about an exercise program that is right for you. Begin slowly, especially if you have been inactive.

www.footsolutions.ca

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